We have always considered ourselves fortunate to have visited Prague and stayed in the city for a number of days.

It is very difficult to consider leaving Prague for even a short time when there is enough to see and do there for weeks, let alone days. But everything we had read about Cesky Krumlov, a couple of hours out of Prague, convinced us we had to go there.

 

The journey there with our group and guide, in our own rented van was in itself a tremendously satisfying experience. We would pass by some amazing scenery.

 

Its history is mixed as it was the area was where the Nazis broke through to capture the country. They have had a lot of recovery to go through and many wounds to heal, physical and psychological.

 

Rolling hills, small farm villages, and preserved architectural treasures along the way make the trip well worth the time, with an even greater reward upon arrival in Cesky Krumlov.

We would gain an appreciation for the rural life of a nation that must make its living out of agriculture and limited industry as a land locked nation.

It was an eye-opening experience that would only be enhanced when we reach Cesky Krumlov.

Like Prague’s Old Town, it too is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, with over 300 protected medieval buildings.

The view from the top of the Krumlov castle is absolutely tremendous. It truly justifies the climb up the rather steep hillside to get there.

 

Named after its founder the Lord of Krumlov, it was created in 1253 around his castle, not as big as the Prague castle, but still the second largest in the country.

 

With fewer than 15,000 residents, it is clear by the number of small hotels, cafes and shopping outlets, that its economy is driven by tourism. It is also the second most visited area of the Czech Republic.

 

It is such a quaint city with a wonderful downtown square, and narrow streets loaded with shops. It is very much an arts city and the crafts created by the locals go well beyond the quick ‘slap them down and turn them out’ pieces you often find in other countries.

 

With fewer than 15,000 residents, it is clear by the number of small hotels, cafes and shopping outlets, that its economy is driven by tourism. It is also the second most visited area of the Czech Republic.

It is such a quaint city with a wonderful downtown square, and narrow streets loaded with shops. It is very much an arts city and the crafts created by the locals go well beyond the quick ‘slap them down and turn them out’ pieces you often find in other countries.

 

In our group, I think most spent the little time we had left for shopping in the art houses, and from what I could see made purchases.

Dining in Cesky Krumlov, like the rest of the Czech Republic, is a fulfilling experience to say the least. There seems to be no such thing as a light meal served in restaurants anywhere in the country.

Even the salads are large and plentiful, often enough for two people. But whatever is served you can be sure it will be delicious.

There are no high rises in the city, and the hotels are all quaint and small.

So many people go to Prague and rightfully stay as long as they can. But to not see some of the rest of the country is to cheat yourself.

And a trip to Cesky Krumlov is a bargain at any price.